Tryout Tutorial
1 The Knowledge-Builder
1.1 Introduction to i-views

Welcome to our tutorial

We are glad that you have downloaded the i-views tryout version. With this tutorial we will guide you through i-views, step by step. You will get to know the basics as well as features of our software.

Please take approx. 40 minutes of your time to process all six sections of the tutorial. You will see that you don’t need any programming skills to use the graph database.

Please do not hesitate to contact us in case you have any questions: support@i-views.de

 

Introduction

This tutorial introduces a knowledge network, produced by the company intelligent views. This example enables you to quickly understand how a knowledge network works and the possibilities offered by i-views for setting it up and maintaining it.


TIP: This tryout-version consists of modelling environment and server. For further information about the architecture of i-views, apis, rest and other technical topics, please consult the i-views-documentation.

Tutorial-Specials

 

Throughout the tutorial you will come across this illustration. With every section you have finished one circle will fill up - thus you can keep track on your training status and success at all times.

 

So let’s start. You will get to know the following contents:

- Installation and launching of the Knowledge-Builder

- The knowledge network in the Knowledge-Builder

 

We wish you lots of fun!

1.2 Installation and launching the Knowledge-Builder
1.2.1 Launching the Knowledge-Builder in Windows

1. Download the i-views tryout version zip file


2. Unpack the i-views tryout zip file with a click on the menu item extract all of the context menu. Open the context menu by making a right click on the zip file.

3. Double-click on the directory “i-views_win” to find the following five objects:


4. Launch the i-views-tryout.exe application per double-click and the start dialogue will be displayed:

 

5. Click  besides the input fields of Semantic network and select the knowledge network i-views-tryout and one of the proposed users. Three users without assigned passwords have been preconfigured for the i-views tryout knowledge network. Click the button Start to confirm your data entries.

 


 

Since the tryout version functions as a server, you might get a security warning as well as a windows firewall warning, which you have to confirm in order to run i-views.

6.       Click the button Allow access and the main window of i-views will open.


TIP: You will find further information for Knowledge-Builder settings, especially for user administration, consulting the i-views-documentation.

1.2.2 Launching the Knowledge-Builder in Mac

1. Download the i-views tryout version zip file.


 

2. Unpack the i-views tryout version zip file by double-clicking on the file.


 

3. Double-click to go to the directory “i-views_mac_os”.


 

4. Open your user folder by Cmd + Shift + H. Copy the directory “i-views” into it, using the shortcut key Cmd + C and, after changing to the user folder, Cmd + V.


 

5. Launch the application i-views-tryout. Click  besides the input fields of Semantic network and select the knowledge network i-views-tryout and one of the proposed users. Three users without assigned passwords have been preconfigured for the i-views tryout knowledge network. Click the button Start to confirm your data entries.


 

TIP: When starting i-views for the first time, a window appears in which the user is asked whether he or she trusts the manufacturer. This window might be overlapped by another window.


6. Click the button Allow access and the main window of i-views will open.


TIP: You will find further information for Knowledge-Builder settings, especially for user administration, consulting the i-views-documentation.

1.2.3 Launching the Knowledge-Builder in Linux

1. Download the i-views tryout version zip file.

2. Open the console by pressing Strg + Shift + T.

3. Go to the directory which contains the downloaded i-views tryout version. Use the following command:

cd / .../download_directory


4. Unpack the i-views tryout version zip file using the following command:

unzip i-views_linux.zip

 

5. Afterwards go to the newly created directory „i-views_linux“ using the following command:

cd i-views_linux

 

The directory „i-views_linux“ contains the following files:

i-views-tryout_en.pdf         i-views-tryout.pdf resources

i-views-tryout.ini                i-views-tryout.sh     volumes

 

To display the content of the directory use the following command:

ls


6. Launch the file “i-views-tryout.sh” using the following command:

./i-views-tryout.sh

 

If the file doesn’t launch, the reasons may be insufficient access rights. Type in the following command and try launching the file again:

chmod 777 i-views-tryout.sh

 

7. Click  besides the input fields of Semantic network and select the knowledge network i-views-tryout and one of the proposed users. Three users without assigned passwords have been preconfigured for the i-views tryout knowledge network. Click the button Start  to confirm your data entries.



8. Click the button Allow access and the main window of i-views will open.


TIP: You will find further information for Knowledge-Builder settings, especially for user administration, consulting the i-views-documentation.

1.3 Explanation: The knowledge network in the Knowledge-Builder

The basis of a knowledge network is formed by its types (person, company, location,...) and objects (Jana Schmidt, Miller plc, Frankfurt...), which have attributes (call number, date of birth,...) assigned to them and which are connected by relations. In the following image, the relations have been visualized:


The tryout knowledge network already contains some types, objects, attributes and relations. They will help you to understand the essential functions using the Knowledge-Builder.

 

Congratulations! You have finished the first section successfully.


Let’s move on. You will get to know the following contents:

- Creating a new object of type organization

- Editing a company

- Searching for an organization

 

We wish you lots of fun!

 

2 The elements of the knowledge network
2.1 Creating and displaying your own objects in the knowledge network
2.1.1 Creating a new object (type "organization")

1. Click on semantic knowledge network in the folder panel on the left of the organizer to open the folder. All types are displayed.

2. Expand the type Organisation and click on Company. The window on the right displays the Objects tab with a list of organisations that already exist.

3. Enter the name of the new company Miller plc in the input line.



4. Now click the butto.

Done. The company Miller plc is created as an object in the knowledge network.

2.2 Editing the newly created company
2.2.1 Assigning a new attribute

The first task for new objects such as companies, persons or products is to complete the attributes assigned to them.

  1. Select the new object Miller plc from the list of objects of companies. The detailed information for Miller plc is now displayed in the lower section of the window.
  2. Click the button and choose also known as (Synonym) from the list of available attributes. 


     
  3. Enter Miplc as the value for the attribute Also known as.



     

You can add other attributes of your choice such as Telephone Number as described in steps 1-3.

2.2.2 Searching for the newly created organisation

As a test, search for a newly created organisation: enter the first four letters ‘milp’ of the synonym in the search box, click on the magnifier symbol to the right of the search box and choose Search Name & Synonym.

 

When searching for mip, the system displays Miller plc in the hit list, indicating that this match was found using the Also known as-attribute.

Tip
For further information about other search types, please refer to section 1.2.

2.3 Adding a relation

In semantic networks relations as connections between objects are an essential feature.
Use the button Add relation to create relations to connect objects: the relation organisation employs person shall be established to connect the objects Hans Henry and Miller plc.

  1. Click the button  and choose the desired relation organisation employs person from the list by clicking:



  2. Enter the name Hans Henry in the input line next to the relation and confirm with RERTURN.



     
  3. If the object (here Hans Henry) does not yet exist, it can be created directly as a relation target. In this case a dialogue has to be confirmed with OK.



     

The new object Hans Henry as an employee of Miller plc is now part of the knowledge network.

2.4 End of chapter and outlook

Congratulations! You have finished the second section successfully.


 

Let’s move on. You will get to know the following contents:

- Displaying objects, types and relations with the graph-editor

- Drawing and deleting relations with the graph-editor

 

We wish you lots of fun!

3 The graph-editor
3.1 Displaying the network

The Knowledge-Builder is a tool for knowledge networks, but so far we have only talked in terms of lists and folders.

The Knowledge-Builder provides the graph-editor for graphical navigable views of the knowledge network. It not only offers a view but it is also an effective tool for editing the knowledge network, i.e. creating and deleting types, establishing relations and much more.

3.1.1 Displaying objects, types and relations with the graph-editor

1. Select the object Miller plc in the search results list.

2. Click the button  .


 

The graph-editor is opened, displaying the object Miller plc.

3. Position the mouse cursor over Miller plc. Two small -icons will appear – one at the top and one to the left of the object.



4. Double-click on the left-hand plus-icon.
The relation between Miller plc and Hans Henry will be displayed: Hans Henry is an employee of the company Miller plc.



Tip
All relations to other objects will be shown by clicking at the -icon. If all relations are already displayed the -icon is used instead of the plus-icon.

3.1.2 Displaying objects and object types via drag & drop
  1. Place the organizer window next to the graph-editor window. You can now drag & drop types and objects from the folders or from the search results box into the graph-editor.
  2. Enter the type London in the search window and perform a simple search by clicking RETURN.



  3. In the search results, highlight London and drag it, by holding down the left mouse button, into the graph-editor window, then drop it.




In so doing you can place more objects from the organizer in the graph-editor window and thus examine a greater number of objects in their semantic context.

3.2 Drawing and deleting relations in the graph-editor

Relations represent connections between different objects and are therefore a core element of the knowledge network. The current graph-editor window contains the objects Hans Henry, Miller plc and London.

 

3.2.1 Drawing relation

1. Move the mouse cursor over Miller plc.
2. Now place the mouse cursor on the -icon to the left, press the left mouse button, hold it down and drag the mouse cursor to London. Release the mouse button.

If there is exactly one possible relation between the selected objects, a grey arrow will appear that connects both objects. If there are multiple possible relations you will have to choose one of them in order to connect the objects.
 


3. Move the mouse cursor to the grey arrow: the text organisation is located in will appear and be visible as long as the mouse cursor is positioned on the relation arrow.

 
4. Switch to the Knowledge Builder. In the left menu, choose the type "Topic" and then "Sector".  Then click on the tab "Objects". Drag the object Construction Branch into the graph-editor.  


 

5. Connect Miller plc with Construction Branch using the relation organisation is part of branch.
Additionally to the relation between London and Miller plc the graph-editor now displays the newly established relation between Miller plc and Construction Branch:

3.2.2 Deleting a relation

1. Imagine you want to delete the relation between Construction Branch and Miller plc: Move the mouse cursor to the relation between Construction Branch and Miller plc.
2. Press the right mouse button on the relation between two objects - the delete relation-window will be displayed.
3. Press the left mouse button on the option delete relation. The relation organisation is part of branch between Construction Branch and Miller plc will be deleted.

3.3 End of chapter and outlook

Congratulations! You have finished the third section successfully.
 

Let’s move on. You will get to know the following contents:
- Creating and editing new types
- Defining and using attributes
- Defining and establishing relations

We wish you lots of fun!

4 Definition of the knowledge networks’ schemas

The knowledge network consists of element types (schema) and elements.


The schema defines which object types, relation types and properties will be elements of the knowledge network – it is the structural design of the network. According to this structural design which has to be com- posed by the user at the very beginning, the network can be complemented successively with new objects with their inter-relations and properties very easily.

4.1 Creating and editing new types

The preceding sections described how to create, modify and delete objects (Miller plc, Mr Hans Henry) belonging to certain types. This section describes how to extend the network by introducing new types.


Types in the knowledge network are organised hierarchically:



A type is always a subtype of another type, altogether being subject to the top-level type. Each new type automatically becomes a subtype of an existing type. For this reason it is very important where you create a new type because every subtype inherits all properties (schema) of its super-type. These logical connections are a huge benefit when being considered during modelling.

For example it is not advisable to create the type state as a subtype of project because the characteristic properties of both types differ highly.

1. Create a new subtype to the type Location.
2. Click on the SEMANTIC KNOWLEDGE NETWORK folder in the organizer. The type tree will be displayed.
3. Click on the grey arrow left to the type Location. The hierarchy view of this type opens: the subtypes (State, Country, City) of Location are displayed.


 
4. Enter Continent in the input line of the Subtypes tab in the right half of the window and click the -button. Now another subtype is assigned.

4.2 Defining and using attributes

Attributes are properties or characteristic features: every object has a name. Other examples for attributes are title, password, post code. Attributes consist of three elements:

1. the attribute type (e.g. date, choice, colour code), which defines the data format of the attribute values,

2. the attribute schema, defining what objects/types (objects of person) can be assigned with values of the attribute and

3. the attribute value (Mr, 64293...) as a concrete characteristic of the property belonging to type or object.

4.2.1 Defining a new attribute schema

The attribute date of birth, which is to be defined for the type person, will illustrate how to introduce new types of attributes and how to assign attribute values.
1. Click the type person in the left part of the organizer. The type editor for person will be displayed in the lower half of the Subtypes tab.


 
2. Click the button .
A selection window will be displayed, listing the various data types in which an attribute can be stored.


 
3. Choose Date as attribute type and confirm your choice with OK.

An editor window will be displayed for the new attribute:


 
4. Enter the name date of birth for the new attribute in the input line Attribute name and confirm with OK.

The option May have multiple occurrences determines whether an attribute can be assigned more than once to a single object (which makes sense, e.g. for the telephone number attribute) or not, as in the case for the attribute date of birth, which can only be assigned once to each person.

4.2.2 Assigning the new attribute

The attribute date of birth now is available to be filled with values for all objects of the type person.

4.3 Defining and establishing relations

Relations form the actual ‘net’ of a knowledge network. They connect types and objects with each other and provide context between objects of the network. Relations consist of two components:

1. a relation schema (relation type), which specifies which objects/types can be connected using a relation and

2. the actual relation (relation object) as a real connection between two objects.
From a technical point of view, each relation schema is a type (relation type) and a specific relation between two objects in the knowledge network is an object (relation object) of the relation type.
To use a relation, a relation schema is mandatory.

4.3.1 Defining a new relation schema

Using the example relation manages project, a relation which is defined for the object type person, you’ll learn how to define a new relation schema.

1. Click the type person in the left part of the organizer. The type editor for person will be displayed in the lower half of the tab Subtypes.


 
2. Click the button .
An editor window for a new relation schema will open:


 
3. Fill in the name manages project for the new relation and has project manager for the inverse part of the new relation.
4. Click the button  next to Target domain.


 
An input window will open. Enter project and confirm with OK.


 
In the selection window choose project as a possible target domain to permit the relation between objects of this type and objects of the type perso. Your cursor is back in the input window of the new relation.

5. Click the button CREATE. The schema definition of the new relation is then complete.

4.3.2 Assigning the new relation

As of now the relation manages project/has project manager is available to connect objects of person and objects of project.

1. Draw the relation manages project/has project manager between Hans Henry and the project Construction Project School.
As a result, the newly built relation will be displayed as follows in the graph-editor:

4.4 End of chapter and outlook

Congratulations! You have finished the fourth section successfully.


Let’s move on. You will get to know the following contents:
- Creating and displaying a search folder
- Creating a simple, a complex and a new structured query

We wish you lots of fun!

5 Searching in the knowledge network
5.1 Searching objects (Tip)

So far you know how to perform a search by using the input field in the left upper corner of the organizer. In addition, the Knowledge-Builder supports complex search queries.

In the following you will learn how to create a search folder.

5.2 Creating and displaying a search folder

Structured queries are stored in search folders. You can find the Searches Folder in the Working Folder in the left part of the Knowledge Builder.

In principle i-views is multilingual and adjusts to the language of your systems software.

However, the searches you create and store in the folder Searches keep the labellings you initially assigned. For this reason the tryout knowledge network provides English as well as German labelled examples.

1. Click the arrow situated in the left part of the organizer window next to Working Folder. The arrowhead will point downward and the contents of the Working folder will be displayed.

 

5.3 Structured queries

Structured queries combine types, objects and relations. Those queries are stored in a folder to be accessed at any time. Only the search query is stored, but not the result. Hence, if the knowledge network changes, the result will change accordingly.

Structured queries are ideal for formulating regular search tasks to run against the know- ledge base: who is responsible for which project with which partner? Who has skills in a specific area and could serve as a contact?

Below some examples already contained in the tryout knowledge network illustrate the power of structured queries.

5.3.1 Creating a simple structured search

Create a search, analyzing the relation person works for organisation.

1. Go to the Searches folder inside the Working Folder and use the button  to create your own structured query. A dialogue window will open.


 
2. Name your new query all employees of organisations in the input line. Choose the search type Structured query by clicking the equivalent on the Standard tab. Confirm your input with OK.

3. Click the new structured query which is now listed in the folder Searches. The still empty query will be displayed in the right part of the organizer.


 
4. Click the field Top-level type and overwrite Top-Level type with Person.  In the following menu you have to choose Person again. Confirm with OK.
5. Click the button and choose the option Relation and then Relations... from the context menu. The Relations selection menu will be shown.



6. Choose person works for organisation. The simple structured query is complete.
7. Trigger the query by clicking the button .
The search result will be displayed in the lower right part of the organizer window.

5.3.2 Creating a complex structured search

Displaying a prefabricated example

The following prefabricated example serves as an introduction to the creation of complexly structured queries: Inside the folder Searches the query companies of construction branch located in London identifies objects of the type Organisation, belonging to the Construction Branch AND being located in London. The constraints of this query are being met by combinations of types, objects, relations and attribute values.

1. Trigger the search by clicking the button ; the search results will be displayed in the lower right section of the organizer window.

5.3.3 Creating a new structured query

Create a new structured query to find organisations located in Germany. This structured query is to use the already existing organisation is located in relation and also includes the constraint of the relation’s transitivity.

1. Create a new search named companies located in Germany inside the folder Searches.
2.    Choose the relation organisation is located in and add the relation is part of to the target object Location.

The query identifies organisations, which are connected to Locations via the relation organisation is located in. The direct locations of organisations (towns) are located in states, which for their part are located in countries. This correlation is represented by the is part of relation.

TIP: The is part of relation has to be included as often as required to consider the Country Germany determined in the query, beginning with City up to the State. The number of iterations of the relation is part of is regulated with the option Repetitions.

3. Activate the option Repetitions by clicking the button at the left side of the relation is part of in the search query:


 
4. The option Repetitions is part of the context menue, opening for the relation. Move the slidecontrol at the lower right of the input line to the right as far as possible. Now the relation will be used at least once in the query and, because of the infinity-parameters , as often as required to proceed the path City is part of State State is part of Country... until the end.


 
5. In order to set the location to Germany, click the button beside the relation target to call up the context menue and select the options Identify and Specify objects.



The complete structured query appears as follows:


 
The search result will be retrieved:



To visualize the search results and the semantic correlations that led to the search result you can use the graph-editor.

6. Select your search results you want to visualize and open the graph-editor. The graphic display of the search results are shown as follows:



Companies located in Germany and their connections to Locations are displayed graphically. Schubert KG is located in Frankfurt, Frankfurt is (a geographical) part of Hesse and Hesse is (a geographical) part of Germany. The company Meier & Sons is also part of the search result, even though there is only one location, but the information for the state is missing. The relation is part of has been traversed two times to find the Schubert KG but only once to find Meier & Sons.

5.4 End of chapter and outlook

 Congratulations! You have finished the fifth section successfully.


 

Final spurt. You will get to know the following contents:

- Building your own models – import & export pf data from external sources (with the aid of an example)
- Other semantic networks
- Contact: Question and Answer

We wish you lots of fun!

6 Building your own models
6.1 Import and Export of dara from external sources

i-views provides a number of ways of importing data into a knowledge network or exporting them from a network. The representation of objects from a knowledge network in a table is known as table mapping or simply mapping.

When importing, the data is read from a table and created in the knowledge network as objects, types or attributes, targets of relations, etc. When exporting, objects of a knowledge network and their properties (attributes, relations) are written in a table. The following data formats are supported:

  •     Fields in CSV format; for example from Excel files
  •     LDAP directories
  •     RDF files
  •     Databases with ODBC, SQL or Oracle interfaces
  •     XML files
6.1.1 Example: Import of persons from a CSV file

Mappings are stored in the Working Folder. The example above shows the mapping for an import of a list of person objects from a CSV file. The import comprises the attribute values for Name, Title and Telephone Number.

The file persondata.csv is part of the tryout installation in order to facilitate the first steps for importing data from external sources. To perform this first import, proceed as follows:

1. Open the mapping Personendaten / person data and click the button next to the path to the file’s location.


 
2. Choose the file persondata.csv which is contained in the folder resources and confirm your choice by clicking OPEN.



3. Click the button  to start the import.


 
4. Check the result by clicking on the type person in the left part of the organizer window in section SEMANTIC KNOWLEDGE NETWORK.
 

6.2 Other semantic networks included in this tryout version

Beside the semantic network i-views-tryout there are two more examples contained in this test version:

  • The semantic network music-example describes semantic objects around the topic music. It is also used as basis for the examples in the i-views documentation.
  • The semantic network your-sandbox is an empty network for you to play with and build your own model from scratch according to your ideas and needs.

The initial username is "admin" in all networks. There is no password.

6.3 Any questions or feedback?

CONGRATULATIONS!

You have finished the last section successfully.

We hope that this brief tutorial has given you an idea of the possibilities offered by a semantic knowledge network. You will find further information on our webpage.

 

6.4 Contact

intelligent views gmbh

Julius-Reiber-Strasse 17

64293 Darmstadt

Germany

Tel. +49 6151 5006-0

E-Mail: support@i-views.de

www.i-views.com

 

Your i-views-team